Sacha Zaliouk

Self-portrait. (1915).

Self-portrait. (1915).

Alexander Davidovich Zaliouk (1887 – 1971) was a Jewish artist, illustrator and sculptor, a member of the École de Paris, and a doyen of the Art Deco. He was born in an impoverished family in Radomysl, Ukraine, and studied at art schools in St Petersburg and Odessa. His early career involved illustrative work for magazines such as Krokodil (1911-12), Southern Weekly (1912-13), and the newspaper Southern Thought (1911). He signed his works Sacha, or Sach or AZ. He participated in exhibitions of the Association of Southern Russian artists in Odessa (1908-12).

In 1912, Sacha moved to Paris and settled in Montparnasse. He continued his education at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, training under Raphaël Collin and François Flameng. In 1914, he enlisted in the French army and fought at Verdun.

In 1919, he attracted attention with his portraits of literary figures, actors and other celebrities. He also created a series of sculptures. Besides portraits, he painted landscapes and generic compositions; nudes; carried out a series of erotic graphic art; created book illustrations. In 1920 he participated in the satirical magazines La Vie Parisienne, Fantasio, La Sourire, Le Journal Amusant, Paris-plaisirs.

Illustration in Fantasie.

Illustration in Fantasio.

In 1921, he participated in the First Russian Exhibition of Arts and Craft at London’s Whitechapel Gallery. He also took part in the Salon d’Automne (1926) as well as the Society of Artists’ La Horde de Montparnasse (1927).

The Lovers.

The Lovers.

Zaliouk became a member of the Salon des Independants in 1951, and of the Parisian salon of the National Union of Arts in 1954.

Untitled.

Untitled.

Nude and pipes.

Nude and pipes.

Beauties by the mast.

Beauties by the mast.

Surrealist composition.

Surrealist composition.

Two nudes.

Two nudes.

The painter and the model. (1929).

The painter and the model. (1929).

The painter and the model. (1923).

The painter and the model. (1923).

(Text from ЗАЛЮК (Цалюк) Александр (Саша) Давидович, at the Art and Architecture of the Russian Diaspora.)

A Gallery Tour, Continued.

So here we are among the works by artists originally displayed as part of the Jack (or Knave) of Diamonds exhibition in Moscow. The notes for each painting are taken from the exhibition cards of the Courtauld Gallery, London.

Mikhail Larionov’s (1881-1964) work below was displayed along with Still life in a Major Key at the Golden Fleece exhibition in Moscow in 1910. The Russian avant-garde artists had an abiding interest in the union of music and painting.

Still life in a minor key, by Mikhail Larionov. (1909).

Still life in a minor key, by Mikhail Larionov. (1909).

This painting was in the first Jack of Diamonds exhibition in Moscow from December 1910 – January 1911. “The nude female bathers form a scene similar to the works of the German Expressionist group the Bruecke (Bridge). Larionov’s use of red-orange and green, opposite colours on the colour wheel, define the figures with a jarring, clashing force.”

Bathers at sunset, by Mikhail Larionov. (1909).

Bathers at sunset, by Mikhail Larionov. (1909).

Aristarkh Lentulov (1882-1943) returned to Moscow and painted this based on his impressions gained from his Parisian life among the French avant-garde. “The artist uses a radical style to depict a very traditional subject, giving the roses a monumental quality through his layering of petals and bright blocks of colour.”

Flowers, by Aristarkh Lentulov. (1913).

Flowers, by Aristarkh Lentulov. (1913).

Natalia Goncharova’s (1881-1962) series of harvest paintings appeared between 1908 and 1911. She imagines a scene of cypresses and pink mountains, and the women’s outfits are unlike those she usually depicted Russian paintings in. Apelsinia was a name she invented for her solo exhibition in 1913 in Moscow. “The work reveals her taste for the exotic and interest in the art of Paul Gauguin.”

Apelsinia, by Natalia Goncharova. (1909).

Apelsinia, by Natalia Goncharova. (1909).

Vladimir Burliuk (1886-1917) was influenced by Cezanne and Cubism. “He often fractured his paintings into interlocking irregular segments, as if translating the principles of stained glass onto canvas.”

Landscape, by Vladimir Burliuk. (1913).

Landscape, by Vladimir Burliuk. (1913).

Olga Rozanova’s (1886-1918) typical style of simple and energetic brushwork and bright colours is exemplified in this work, executed three years before her death. The playing cards theme was one she returned to throughout her life, “emphasising that her art was based on card games often played in streets, bars and funfairs.”

Queen of Diamonds, by Olga Rozanova. (1915).

Queen of Diamonds, by Olga Rozanova. (1915).

Innokenti Annenesky’s play Thamyris, The Cither Player (Famira Kifared) was staged at the Moscow Chamber Theatre to Alexandra Exter’s design, which incorporated traditional art of her native Ukraine and referenced ancient Greek friezes. “With their graphic clarity and arrangement of bold colours, Exter’s designs contributed to a rhythmic framework shaping the performance itself.”

Greeks (Costume design), by Alexandra Exter. (1916).

Greeks (Costume design), by Alexandra Exter. (1916).

This was a design created by Goncharova for the astronomer Magus in a ballet (Liturgie) that never saw the light of day. Here she displays her interest in Russian folk art, peasant embroidery and icon painting. She was at the same time beginning her fruitful collaboration with Sergei Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes.

Magus (Costume design), by Natalia Goncharova. (1915).

Magus (Costume design), by Natalia Goncharova. (1915).

Avant-Garde Outing Continued Again

(Text below is from the St Petersburg Gallery’s exhibition notes for Russian Revolution in Art, Russian Avant-Garde: 1910 – 1932, running in London till September 20, 2014.)

Vyacheslav Levkievsky’s painting Tramway was displayed in the 1914 exhibition N°4, a show that (Mikhail) Larionov described as uniting artists that were ‘not in any way related to each other apart from their youth, their forward-looking vision and their problem-solving approach in the realm of painting while nevertheless being like-minded in their thoughts and feelings’.

Woman with guitar.

Woman with mandolin, by Vladimir Burliuk. (1913).

Vyacheslav Levkievsky.

Tramway, by Vyacheslav Levkievsky. (1914).

Self-portrait, by Yuri Annenkov. (1960).

Self-portrait, by Yuri Annenkov. (1960).

Sketch for the painting "Battle", by Aristarkh Lentulov. (1913).

Sketch for the painting “Battle”, by Aristarkh Lentulov. (1913).

Three designs of book cover "Evreinov, Kamensky, Lentulov", by Aristarkh Lentulov. (1914).

Three designs of book cover “Evreinov, Kamensky, Lentulov”, by Aristarkh Lentulov. (1914).

The Fool's Ball, by Jean Pougni. (1915-16)

The Fool’s Ball, by Jean Pougni. (1915-16)

Design, by Gustav Klutsis. (1922).

Design, by Gustav Klutsis. (1922).

Sun, by Mikhail Matyushin. (1921).

Sun, by Mikhail Matyushin. (1921).

Alexander Volkov

I popped over to Christie’s where Alexander Volkov’s art is being exhibited. Of Sand and Silk closed yesterday after a run of about three weeks. It’s stunningly vibrant, colourful and imaginative, and is – as far as I can make out – being exhibited outside the erstwhile Soviet Union for the first time.

Self Portrait. (1938).

Self-portrait. (1938).

There was nobody else viewing the paintings so I managed to stick around for quite a while without guilt or interruption. Luckily, too, Christie’s had no objections to my taking pictures of the works. I photographed a few which I present below.

Alexander Volkov (Александр Николаевич Волков) (1886 – 1957) was of Russian origin, but born and brought up in Uzbekistan, and combined in himself a simultaneous foreignness as well as nativeness. He studied in St Petersburg and Kiev, and created in his art a synthesis of modern European styles with Uzbek folk art.

The title of the exhibition references ‘the two subjects preoccupying the artist in his early work: Central Asia’s landscape and the life of a city whose prosperity was closely linked to the production of vibrantly-coloured silk. ‘Sand’ and ‘silk’ also allude to the visceral nature of Volkov’s paintings, in which he often mixed sand into the pigment to create texture, juxtaposing the grain with multiple delicate layers of diluted paints and varnish to create very fine gradations of colour.’ [1]

Volkov’s early work was strongly influenced by Mikhail Vrubel (1856-1910), a symbolist painter from Russia. Vrubel insisted that art is inseparable from everyday life, a message that Volkov took back with him to Uzbekistan after studying Vrubel’s frescoes at the Church of St Cyril in Kiev: he closely referenced Vrubel’s art but admitted his own experience and reality in Uzbekistan in his work.

The latter part of the exhibition dealt with Volkov’s Cubo-Futurist period – his compositions are divided into triangles. ‘The resulting highly dynamic works capture not only the movement, but also the sound of a passing caravan, the hub of the bazaar or the rhythm of dance.’ [1] Here are his almost ethnographic studies of the daily life and rapidly changing conditions of the Uzbeks.

Mountain rivers. (1914-15).

Mountain rivers. (1914-15).

Nude (Golden). (1915).

Nude (Golden). (1915).

Volkov rarely painted directly from nature. Instead, he would walk to the mountains (sometimes walking as far as 90 km to see a sunrise) or to the oldest part of a town and then rush home to paint while still under the impression of beauty of the sights he had seen‘. [2]

In the Chimgan Mountains. (1915).

In the Chimgan Mountains. (1915).

Repose. (1917).

Repose. (1917).

At the teahouse (During a journey). (1917).

At the teahouse (During a journey). (1917).

Untitled. (1917).

Untitled. (1917).

Sheikhantaur. (1917).

Sheikhantaur. (1917).

Bathers. (c. 1917).

Bathers. (c. 1917).

Family. (c. 1918).

Family. (c. 1918).

Below are two paintings from the series Eastern Primitive, which unites a highly diverse body of work in oil, tempera and watercolour and was regarded by the artist as one of the greatest achievements of his artistic career. The simplified compositions, strong outlines and approach to space testify to the artist’s fervid interest in Oriental miniature painting and Byzantine art. [3]

Road. (1918).

Road. (1918).

An Eastern school. (1918).

An Eastern School. (1918).

In 1911, an American journalist, William Eleroy Curtis, observed (of the people in Central Asia): ‘Everybody wears a coat like a rainbow. The poor make them of cotton prints and the rich of silk and brocades… No matter how humble or hungry a man may be, and even if he have but a single garment, that is made of the most brilliantly coloured material he can find.’ [4]

Figures at a mosque. (1918).

Figures at a mosque. (1918).

At the time Volkov worked, women in Central Asia were in purdah, excluded from social life, their windows shielded, and in the household itself, secluded to a separate area. So ‘women rarely appear in Volkov’s early works, mirroring their absence from everyday life in Turkestan. There are, however, numerous compositions depicting nude female figures bathing, most likely Volkov’s fantasy vision of life inside a harem, which the artist likely never saw in reality.’ [5]

Women. (c. 1919-20).

Women. (c.1919-20).

Coquette. (1920).

Coquette. (1920).

Fatigue. (c. 1920).

Fatigue. (c.1920).

Caravans were a recurring theme in Volkov’s work alongside chaikhanas (Central Asian teahouses), musicians and beauties.‘ [6] Below, you can see how the triangles depict the noise of a caravan passing before the viewer, all discord and moving shapes.

Caravan. (1920).

Caravan. (1920).

Women. (1921).

Women. (1921).

Below, the painter addresses a Biblical subject while incorporating elements of Central Asia’s ancient pagan mythology. Bare-breasted women dressed in bright colours, for example, are more likely to be ancient goddesses of fertility than pious Marys at Christ’s tomb… [a combination of] a sense of tragedy and joy of life, monumentality and intimacy. [7]

Pietà (The Lamentation). (1921).

Pietà (The Lamentation). (1921).

References

[1] From the exhibition notes – Biography

[2] From the exhibition notes – Moonlit mausoleums, 1915.

[3] From the exhibition notes – An Eastern school, from the series Eastern Primitive.

[4] From the exhibition notes – Figures at a mosque, 1918.

[5] From the exhibition notes – Women, circa 1919-20.

[6] From the exhibition notes – Caravan, 1920.

[7] From the exhibition notes – Pieta (The Lamentation), 1921.

Lives of the Artists III

In 1910, Marc Chagall was desperate. He wanted to go to Paris but couldn’t afford it. He was biding his time in Vitebsk, his birth place, and painting furiously. His girlfriend Bella was in town as well and posing in the nude for him. For their Orthodox Jewish families, this was unspeakably shocking. Chagall’s mother saw one of his paintings of Bella hanging on the wall. He wrote in his memoirs:

“What’s that?”

A naked woman, breasts, dark spots.

I’m embarrassed; so is she.

“Take that girl away!” she says.

“Dear little Mama! I love you very much. But … haven’t you ever seen yourself in the nude? As for me, I only look and sketch her, that’s all.”

However, I obeyed my mother. I put away the canvas and, in place of that nude, I painted another picture, a procession.

(From Jackie Wullschlager, Chagall: Love and Exile, Penguin, 2010.)

Daniel Daran

There’s amazingly little information I’ve been able to find about Daniel Daran except for a quick career roundup, which tells little about the man. Of course, one could aver that the art is more important than the artist, and in fact in this case (out of sheer laziness) I shall, indeed, aver that. Here are some more paintings in varied genres by him.

Women with Guitars

If you were paying attention, you may have noted Konstantin Korovin’s painting of a woman holding a guitar in a post from about a week ago. It appears that lots of artists have been attracted to this theme, and many of them are Russian. There are also other great names – notably Renoir and Matisse and Botero and Braque. In fact, Vermeer also painted a guitar-playing woman, and she bears a strange resemblance to Alanis Morissette – at least to my eye.

I’ll tell you what I’ll do. I stick the images of the Russian (and I hope you recall that when I say ‘Russian’ I continue to mean ‘of the erstwhile Russian / Soviet empires / diaspora / modern Russia / post-Soviet republics’) artworks first, and then point you to a few links for the depictions of women with guitars from the rest of the planet. How about that?

So here goes. Konstantin Korovin was quite profligate with guitar-chicks.

Lady with guitar. Konstantin Korovin. (1911).

Girl with guitar. Konstantin Korovin. (1916).

Woman with guitar. Konstantin Korovin. (1919).

Night. Duet. Konstantin Korovin. (1921).

Aristarkh Lentulov did his bit as well.

Woman with guitar. Aristarkh Lentulov. (1913).

Nearly thirty years earlier, Vasily Surikov painted the duchess S. A. Kropotkina wielding the instrument. Not quite a slide-guitar, however.

Portrait of the duchess S. A. Kropotkina. Vasily Surikov. (1882).

Vladimir Lebedev painted a portrait in oils of a nude sitting with a guitar.

Woman with guitar. Vladimir Lebedev. (1930).

I’m not entirely sure when S. Lysenko did the one below, or even who this painter is. Any ideas?

Gypsy woman with guitar. S. Lysenko.

How about a modern and up-to-date rendition of the theme? Here’s Viktor Vinokurov.

Girls with guitars. Viktor Vinokurov. (2006).

Or we can go way back and admire another work involving women and guitars. Vladimir Borovikovsky painted the Gagarin sisters, who – as you can see – can very well pass for any of Jane Austen’s heroines. (Note, though, that the Gagarins were a princely lot.) Borovikovsky was born in a Cossack family of icon painters in the Ukraine, but headed to Russia as soon as he decently could. I’ll call him a Ukrainian, shall I?

Portrait of A. G. and V. G. Gagarina. Vladimir Borovikovsky. (1802).

The brilliant Parashutov continues to anticipate my every move – his post from 9 June 2009 has several guitar-related works. The next few are all from his blog.

Girl with guitar. Nikolai Kupreyanov. (1928).

Look at this rather weak portrait from 1982 by Yuri Kossagovsky.

Woman with guitar. Yuri Kossagovsky. (1982).

Here’s Vasily Svarog’s Guitarist (date unknown):

Guitarist. Vasily Svarog.

Now for an Armenian. Ashot Asatryan has a lovely piece from a few years ago.

Evening. Ashot Asatryan. (2004).

And, to round things off, we have the Dagestani painter Mukhtar Bagandov. I’ve not been able to date this painting, but it is from this century.

Girl with guitar. Mukhtar Bagandov.

Other Women with Guitars

1. Parashutov’s series extends nearly 20 posts on the guitar, but includes men and still lifes with guitars. Take your pick.

2. Likewise, Meloteca has a nice set of guitar-related paintings from around the world.

Tbilisi Avant-Garde

Between 1918 and 1921, the Caucasian republic of Georgia briefly enjoyed independence from its erstwhile masters, the Russian Empire. This was not to last, of course, because the Communists soon reoccupied the country. But during the short years following the October Revolution, Tbilisi (or Tiflis), the Georgian capital, became a focal point for avant-garde art. The commingling of creativity between the Russians escaping the Bolsheviks and the local avant-gardists became an exciting movement that has been woefully underreported.

To make amends, three years ago in New York an exhibition titled ‘The Fantastic Tavern: The Tbilisi Avant-Garde‘ opened at the Casey Kaplan gallery [1]. This was one episode in a long effort by Daniel Baumann and allied Georgian historians to promote and disseminate the works of Georgian Dadaists, modernists, Futurists – set designers, musicians, writers, artists.

Grigol Robakidze described Tbilisi of that time thus:

“Tbilisi is a strange city, but in 1919-1920 it became even more stranger. Russians thrown out or escaped from Russia were sheltering here. From the stage one can hear Kachalov’s voice… Khodotov was in Tbilisi too and his voice sounded from the stage as well. The drunk composer Cherepnin used to seat in café and grieved about Russia. The artist Sergey Sudeikin was painting the restaurant, which by Georgian poets was called “Kimerioni”– Sudeikin really filled up the restaurant with Chimeras. The artist Savelii Sorin was painting the profiles of elegant noble women on the canvases with beautiful, very beautiful lines… Who was not over there in Tbilisi for that time? Futurists stepped toward Dadaism here too. They created organization “41 Degrees”. In Tbilisi was Ilia Zdanevich too, he was great, when was reading his “Smert Garro”… Vasili Kamenski visited Tbilisi as well. There were others there too.” [2]

Actress Margarita, by Niko Pirosmani. (1909).

(One of the effects of the influx of foreign artists and bohemians into Tbilisi was the encouragement of the so-called primitivist art that was already quite established in the country. The self-taught Niko Pirosmani, for example, was one who was promoted by the influential Zdanevich brothers. We’ll take a look at his work in a later post.)

Self-portrait, by Shalva Kikodze. (1920).

In 1919, the Society of Georgian Artists, after an exhibition of local works, nominated and sponsored three artists for further advancement to Paris: David Kakabadze, Shalva Kikodze and Lado Gudiashvili.

In the “Self-Portrait” by Kikodze the influence of academic classic painting is still markedly visible; however, indisputable talent and artistic intuition add more internal energy and graphic vividness to the portrait. In his works of that period the interest towards colour characteristic and free painting manner is evident to which adds the skilful broad brushstroke manner of painting and the impulse which would subsequently manifest itself in his works and bring him closer to German expressionism, but in some cases his art works are very close to Symbolism as well. [3]

Bather in the woods, by Lado Gudiashvili. (1923).

Many of Gudiashvili’s works of the 1920s are not devoid of pessimism and melancholy, in part because the artist recognised the doom of the ancient Georgian way of life since his youth. Still, in the (Paris) years of realisation of a new reality and the re-evaluation of essential values, Gudiashvili retained a fidelity towards beauty – his conception of the Eternal Feminine – which directly linked his work with the tradition of Russian and French symbolism. [4]

Imeretia – my mother! by David Kakabadze. (1918).

It was due to David Kakabadze and some representatives of his generation that the genres of landscape and still life had evolved in Georgia, while “Imereti – My Mother” is an epic picture, in which Kakabadze intermingled these two genres and generalized the idea of Georgia. By their content these symbolic works fully correspond to the beliefs and pursuits of Georgia of those times. From the viewpoint of form all David Kakabadze’s knowledge and experience that he possesed by then, are combined in them. In these pictures the artist presents himself as a truly popular artist, highly professional, a classicist and modernist at one and the same time. All the details in his compositions are thoroughly thought out and balanced with one another. Nothing is erratic. But inner rhythm, pulsation are very strong. In these works the heart is beating of a man, deeply in love with motherland and creation, the heart of a great thinker. [5]

An epicentre of Georgian cultural life was the artistic cafe. In Tiflis there were three famous ones, one (Fantastic Tavern) giving its name to the exhibition that I mentioned above. The murals on these were some of the earliest examples of the Tbilisi avant-garde. Artists from all over the Russian empire painted them.

Fantastic Tavern was decorated by Lado Gudiashvili, Alexander Petrakovski, Niko Nikoladze, Yuri Degen, Illia Zdanevich, Ser Gey in 1917.) The walls of Argonaut’s Boat were painted by Kiril Zdanevich, Lado Gudiashvili, Bajbeuk-Melikov in 1918 and Qimerioni – by Serge Sudeikin, Lado Gudiashvili, David Kakabadze in 1919. No wall paintings of St. Petersburg, Moscow or Strasbourg exist any more. In this connection it is very important that the wall paintings of two Tbilisi artistic cafes, Argonaut’s Boat and Qimerioni still remain. Qimerioni is remarkable because the wall paintings so much completely preserved here can only be found in Paris La Coupol nowadays. [6]

One of the most influential movements in Tiflis was the Art Nouveau, which began in Europe at the end of the 19th century and spread widely in the early 20th. In Tiflis, the result was an explosion of cafes and theatres and hospitals and banks and libraries designed in this genre. The Art Nouveau cinema was perhaps the most significant. Sadly few of these are in good shape today – the continuing effort of the Soviet authorities to suppress Georgian culture can be thanked for this. While Georgian avant-garde films were tolerated, the less said about the fate of Georgian art the better. When the Soviets reoccupied Georgia, again the cultured class was scattered or shot, and the cultural life in Tiflis began to mutate under official pressure. Few of the Georgians managed to leave, but for the Russians who had come to the Caucasus to escape the Bolsheviks, it was time to depart too. “For them the period of existing in Tbilisi modernist environment became a certain transitional stage from Russian to international, multi-cultural art; in other words thanks to [their] Tbilisi experience it was easier for them after their emigration to the West [to] integrate into European contemporary culture and co-exist there.” [7]

References

  1. Casey Kaplan Gallery, The Fantastic Tavern: The Tbilisi Avant-GardePress Release.
  2. Quote by Grigol Robakidze, from Mzia Chikhradze, “Integration/Expansion, Georgian-Russian Cultural Relationships in 1910-1980s“, Harriman Institute at Columbia University, May 4, 2009.
  3. Mzia Chikhradze, ‘Tiflis of the 1910s-1920s, Culture and Art‘, Harriman Institute at Columbia University.
  4. State Tretyakov Art Gallery: Lado Gudiashvili – The Paris Years. Exhibition (18/11/2009 – 10/01/2010) introduction.
  5. Ketevan Kintsurashvili’s ART LINE: David Kakabadze – A Great Georgian Modernist.
  6. Tea Tatabadze, “Tbilisi Artistic Cafes (1917-1921). Qimerioni“, Harriman Institute at Columbia University.
  7. As #3.

Władysław Podkowiński

From the late 17th century till the end of the First World War in 1918, many parts of Poland were under the Russian rule. While the Poles never accepted the term ‘Russian Poland’, claiming that Poland was always Polish, the Russians, too, weren’t quite happy with it. As far as they were concerned, Poland had ceased to exist, and those lands were, indeed, Russian. But as with the Finns, living under the imperial yoke meant making adjustments. One of them was the realisation that much of the artistic elite of the empire was concentrated in St Petersburg. So young and artistic Poles would find themselves in the capital, making their way in the world.

One such Pole was Władysław Podkowiński (1866 – 1895). Born in Warsaw, his early art education was in his native town. At the age of 21, he proceeded to the St Petersburg Imperial Academy of Fine Arts. The following year, he returned to Warsaw, where he became an illustrator for a local publication. It was after a trip to Paris in 1889 that his interest in Impressionism began. Suffering from tuberculosis, his short life ended scarcely six years later.

Podkowiński is credited with the introduction of Impressionism into Polish art. Whereas he did not consider his early works seriously (he looked upon his landscapes as a hobby), he was profoundly influenced by Claude Monet’s oeuvre, which propelled his artistic development. Towards the end of his life, he switched to Symbolism.

Frenzy of Exultations. (1894).

Podkowiński’s works were executed mainly in oils as well as watercolour. He also painted several portraits. His most famous work is the Frenzy of Exultations (1894), a Symbolist piece, which caused a scandal upon exhibition. It depicted a nude red-headed woman on an unsaddled rearing horse. Supposedly inspired by unrequited love, it was displayed in public only for thirty-seven days, after which Władysław Podkowiński arrived with a knife and cut it up for reasons unknown. It was restored after his death.

Cavalryman. (1885).

Self-portrait. (1887).

Leaving for the hunt. (1888).

Paris by the Seine. (1889).

Portrait of Czesław Jankowski. (1890).

View of New Slupia. (1890)

Girl in the garden (Bronisia). (1891).

Łubin in the sun. (1891).

Nowy Świat street, Warsaw, on a summer's day. (1892).

Nowy Świat street, Warsaw, on a winter's day. (1892).

Wet. (1892).

Forest landscape (in Chrzęsnem?). (1893).

Children in the garden. (1892).

Lily of the valley. (1892).

Stream between the trees. (1893).

Girl in a hat with flowers. (1894).

Girl with a hoop. (1894).

In the garden. (1895).

Conversation. (1894).