Bogdan Willewalde

If you were following the series on the Napoleonic invasion of Russia in 1812 that I posted last year, the name of Willewalde should not come as a surprise to you. Gottfried (or, in Russian, Bogdan – gift of God) Willewalde (1812 – 1903) was not only one of the foremost academic military artists of the nineteenth century, but also an important court artist to the Russian imperium.

One of the special attributes of Willewalde’s paintings is their extreme attention to detail, so much so that individuals can be identified by their likenesses even in the most crowded works; also, the paintings provide a superb glimpse into the protocols, dresses and uniforms, and indeed interior decor of the periods depicted.

I was interested enough in the man’s works that I created an English Wikipedia page for him. Check it out for biographical details.

Here’s a brief gallery of his works. First, some court-related paintings – not great quality, I’ve gotta say.

Czar Nicholas and Crown-Prince Alexander in the artist's studio, 1854.

Czar Nicholas and Crown-Prince Alexander in the artist’s studio, 1854.

Ceremonial entry of their Imperial Highnesses into the Moscow before their coronation August 17, 1856.

His Imperial Highness Nikolai Alexandrovich (the heir apparent) takes the oath at the Georgiev coronation hall in the Winter Palace, September 8, 1859.

Inauguration of the monument 'A Millennium of Russia' at Novgorod in 1862. (1864).

Inauguration of the monument ‘A Millennium of Russia’ at Novgorod in 1862. (1864).

His Imperial Highness Alexander Alexandrovich (the heir apparent) takes his oath at the Georgiev Throne hall of the Winter Palace, July 20, 1866.

And here are some military paintings.

They were imprisoned in 1814. (1885).

They were imprisoned in 1814. (1885).

"Today it's you, tomorrow it'll be me", Kulm, 1813. (1886).

“Today it’s you, tomorrow it’ll be me”, Kulm, 1813. (1886).

Scene at the milestone. (1859).

Scene at the milestone. (1859).

Greetings, Beloved France. (1898).

Greetings, Beloved France. (1898).

Blucher and Cossacks at Bautzen. (1885).

Blucher and Cossacks at Bautzen. (1885).

Attack of the hussars at Warsaw

Attack of the Leib-Hussars at Warsaw.

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